Phase One Practice Exercise

The first step in this process of controlling your brain chemistry is to create a comfortable environment. The next exercise might not be a thing to do at a coffee shop or the library. If you don’t have an available place at home, you might want to try sitting in your car or finding a semi-secluded space in nature. Again, having a friend or professional nearby might be helpful if your triggers tend to spiral.

Remember: if you have addictions, try to avoid using anything connected to your addictive patterns in this section. You may think this is your only real solution, but I promise, there is always a better way, a world free of guilt and shame and the immense pain accompanying addictive behavior. Don’t worry about controlling your additions. When you feel a craving, just try several healthy options first. Soon, you will be free of addiction and finally in control of your own life.

Suggested exercises that help us in this effort are listed below, but remember, not everything works for everyone. You can highlight or take note of those that resonate with you. You’ll try some, and they’ll work while others won’t. Just keep going. Something is going to make you feel better. Most of us have used coping mechanisms—of one kind or another—in this way our entire life. Get a feeling for what you think will work and note it. Then, disregard what doesn’t.

Please note; you only need to do this exercise once, as a practice round. It’s just here to show you how easy it can be to trigger fight-or-flight at will and then shut it down as well. Once you’ve had a chance to experience controlling a trigger, you should be able to see a hint of how your state of consciousness really can be up to you.

The next step in your process is to do the practice. Make sure you have plenty of time and space to really engage. This is an opportunity to create a powerful shift in perception. I look forward to seeing where you can go with it.